Consciousness; it's a science thing

Consciousness; it's a science thing
TEDCERN was a lot of fun. The speakers were amazing, covering cosmology, cancer cures, underwater earthquakes, gender politics, ignoble bras, the Higgs boson (of course) and more. I recommend a trawl through them all here. You may even spot me …
Read more on The Guardian

Boy who lost consciousness after circumcision dies
A baby boy died in a Holon hospital on Friday morning after slipping into unconsciousness during a circumcision ceremony. He was taken to the hospital in critical condition on Thursday. The Chief Rabbinate and both chief rabbis sent their condolences …
Read more on The Times of Israel

Legacy , community relevance and budget consciousness are key to Games
Legacy, community relevance and budget consciousness are key to Games success. Tuesday 11 June 2013. It is now just over one year until the start of the biggest sporting and cultural festival ever to take place in Scotland, the Glasgow 2014 …
Read more on Herald Scotland

The Neuroscience of Consciousness

Baroness Susan Greenfield CBE, is a British scientist, writer, broadcaster and member of the House of Lords. Specialising in the physiology of the brain, Sus…
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Jill Sobule & Julia Sweeney

Jill Sobule & Julia Sweeney
Event on 2013-09-13 20:00:00

STG Presents Jill Sobule & Julia Sweeney at the Neptune in Seattle on Friday, September 13, 2013.

Jill Sobule: Jill Sobule belongs to a rare breed of artists. Her work is at once deeply personal and socially conscious, seriously funny and derisively tragic. Over five albums and a decade of recording, the Denver-born songwriter/ guitarist/singer has tackled such topics as the death penalty, anorexia, shoplifting, reproduction, the French resistance movement, adolescence, and the Christian right. Did we mention love? Love found, love lost, love wished for and love taken away.

While her songs cover a huge amount of ground, they all have benefit greatly from Jill’s subtle intelligence and skillful light-handedness. No sloganeering flag-and-fist waving here, but rather story songs about human beings, real and imagined, which allow us to step back from the issue, be it personal or social, and relate to it as we would a close friend.

To see Jill live and in concert is a rare treat. It is on stage that she is most comfortable, most powerful, and where the delicacy and range of her work can be best appreciated. She entertains, amuses, provokes, and more often then not, takes her audiences on an emotional roller coaster, from comedy to pathos in a few bars of music.

Jill began playing guitar when she joined the Junior High School band. She never learned to read music, though, and faked her way through rehearsals and performances by playing by ear. As she began writing songs, it was very clear to Jill this was becoming more than a teenage hobby. Music was serious stuff. She played in a variety of funk and rock bands in Colorado, and eventually made her first, Todd Rundgren-produced, album for MCA, Things Here Are Different.

But success did not knock on her door until three years later, when Atlantic Records released her MTV staple and national top 20 hit, I Kissed A Girl. “That song was a double-edged sword for me,” Jill Says. “It was perceived as a novelty hit, but on the other hand it was the first song with an overtly gay topic to be aired on Top 40 radio. I am quite proud of that.” The self-titled album also yielded another hit song, Supermodel, included in the Clueless soundtrack.

The song also jump-started her live music career in a big way, and since then she’s had the honor to induct Neil Diamond in the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, to share the stage with the likes of Neil Young (at his yearly Bridge School benefit concerts), fellow activists Billy Bragg & Steve Earle, and Waren Zevon. Quite the serious guitar player, she even toured the world as lead guitarist in Lloyd Cole’s band a few years back.

Since then, she has made four more critically acclaimed albums, Happy Town, Pink Pearl, Underdog Victorious, and 2009's California Years, which Jill released on her own record label, Pinko Records, after collecting over ,000 from fans who funded the project.

A veritable gypsy, Jill divides her time between a busy touring schedule and a variety of other projects. She has played the role of political troubadour for NPR stations across the country and for Air America Radio. She also served as songwriter/composer for the hit Nickelodeon network show Unfabulous during that show’s three-season run. She composed the music for the off-Broadway show Prozak and the Platypus and co-starred in the Eric Schaeffer film Mind the Gap.

In the words of New York Times pop music critic Jon Pareles, “Jill Sobule can claim her place among the stellar New York singer-songwriters of the last decade. Topical, funny and more than a little poignant… grown-up music for an adolescent age.”

at Neptune Theatre
1303 NE 45th
Seattle, United States

Issues related to environment and development should be embedded in the

Issues related to environment and development should be embedded in the
“Our purpose is to see that issues related to environment and development get embedded in the consciousness of the people, and if we carry out an assessment of people's attitude and how they view these issues, then clearly we are also creating …
Read more on Reuters AlertNet (blog)

Distinguishing REM sleep from other conscious states
(Medical Xpress)—Despite decades of research, little is known about the function of REM sleep, or the dreams that often accompany it. Rapid eye movements occur in most mammals, with a few exceptions like echidnas and dolphins. In humans, they be …
Read more on Medical Xpress

Consciousness: Why we need to build sentient machines
FROM C-3PO of Star Wars to Wall-E, the sentient garbage collector, the prevalence of conscious machines in the stories we tell seems to reflect humanity's deep desire to turn creator and design an artificial intelligence. It might seem as if we stand …
Read more on New Scientist

Jimmie Vaughan

Jimmie Vaughan
Event on 2013-07-05 21:00:00

Supporting Acts: Mike Flanigin, The Horton Brothers

Jimmie Vaughan

Jimmie Vaughan is far more than just one of the greatest and most respected guitarists in the world of popular music. As Guitar Player Magazine notes, "He is a virtual deity–a living legend." After all, Vaughan provides a vital link between contemporary music and its proud heritage, as well as being a longtime avatar of retro cool. Since releasing his first solo album in 1994, he has set the standard for quality modern roots music. Throughout his career, Vaughan has earned the esteem of his legendary guitar-playing heroes and superstar peers along with successive generations of young players. His musical ethos and personal style have had an impact on contemporary culture, from spearheading the current blues revival with The Fabulous Thunderbirds to his longtime, innate fashion sense of slicked-back hair and sharp vintage threads (now seen throughout the pages of contemporary fashion journals) to becoming a premier designer of classic custom cars. But for Jimmie Vaughan, none of it is part of a crusade or a career plan. It's just his natural way of living his life and pursuing the interests that have captivated Vaughan since his youth. Now, with his third solo release and Artemis Records debut, Do You Get The Blues?, Vaughan has fashioned his most compelling and appealing musical statement yet, creating a rich and variegated masterpiece of 21st Century rhythm and blues. From the first notes of the opening instrumental, "Dirty Girl," it's clear that Vaughan has created a contemporary classic. Driven by Vaughan's lyrical guitar work, the skin-tight drumming of George Rains and the verdant Hammond B-3 work of the song's writer, Bill Willis (whose long career includes work on the seminal R&B and blues sides issued by King Records as well as stints with Freddie King and Lavern Baker), the song speaks volumes without a single word, and sets a tone of distinctive and emotion-laden musical articulation that continues throughout the disc. Do You Get The Blues? travels through a virtual galaxy of musical moods and modes across its 11 vibrant selections. Highlights include a rare Jimmie Vaughan acoustic slide track–a tribute to his friend and mentor Muddy Waters–and harp by blues legend James Cotton on "The Deep End," a fusion of vintage R&B and jazz on "Don't Let The Sun Set," the sexy and seductive mood of "Slow Dance," the syncopated soul of "Let Me In," and a classic Texas blues shuffle with "Robbin' Me Blind." Jimmie offers a glimpse of the continuing Vaughan legacy on "Without You," co-written by his son, rising Austin musician Tyrone Vaughan, who plays guitar with Jimmie on the track. The album also features Texas singing legend Lou Ann Barton, a founding member of The Fabulous Thunderbirds. Jimmie and Lou Ann's potent vocal chemistry shines on the fiery "Out Of The Shadows" and the searing "Power of Love." The two also join forces with the Double Trouble rhythm section of Tommy Shannon and Chris Layton on the classic shouter, "In The Middle of the Night." By the time the album lands on "Planet Bongo," the imaginative mood piece that caps the disc, it's clear that Do You Get The Blues? is a tour de force that draws from Jimmie Vaughan's vast reservoir of musical traditions to create a modern classic. "I wanted to make a romantic blues album," explains Vaughan. "I was listening to a lot of Sarah Vaughan and a lot of jazz. So I wanted to put my dirty blues guitar and the romantic feelings and the ins and outs of love together on one album. It's got a lot of gospel stylings, it's got blues, it's got R&B. I don't consciously think, okay, we need to put some of this in here; I like that beat, that's cool. I don't plan it out or try to decipher what it is. I just try to create what I feel." Vaughan's musical abilities and sense of style were obvious from an early age. Growing up in Oak Cliff, just south of downtown Dallas, TX., he was weaned on classic Top 40 radio (which was invented in his hometown), vintage blues, early rock'n'roll and the deepest rhythm and blues and coolest jazz of the day, thanks to the sounds he heard on Dallas' AM radio powerhouse KNOX and border radio stations like XERB, where personalities like the legendary Wolfman Jack sparked a youth revolution. "I never got over that stuff, and I never will. That's the kind of music I like," he explains. When he was sidelined by a football injury at the age of 13, a family friend gave Vaughan a guitar to occupy him during his recuperation. From the moment Jimmie's fingers touched the fretboard, it was obvious that he was a natural talent. "It was like he played it all his life," his mother Martha Vaughan later noted. He also began tutoring his younger brother Stevie, who would cite Jimmie as his biggest inspiration and influence throughout his own career. At age 15, Vaughan started his first band, The Swinging Pendulums, and was soon playing the rough and tumble Dallas nightclub scene many nights a week. By the time he hit 16, Jimmie joined The Chessman, who became the area's top musical attraction, eventually opening concerts in Dallas for Jimi Hendrix. After hearing Muddy Waters and Freddie King play in Dallas, Vaughan began to delve deep into the blues, melding his many influences into a style that was clean, economical and highly articulate, concentrating on rhythmic accents and lead work that relies on the power of his less is more approach. In 1969, Vaughan helped found Texas Storm, a group that eschewed Top 40 covers for blues and soul with a Texas accent. The band eventually migrated to Austin, where they won over the college crowd and the Black and Chicano communities on the Capital City's East Side. Vaughan also helped jump start his brother Stevie's career when the younger Vaughan joined Texas Storm on bass. Determined to create an ideal vehicle for blues music that was both modern in its impact and appeal yet true to the tradition, Vaughan founded The Fabulous Thunderbirds with Kim Wilson in the mid 1970s. When Antone's nightclub opened in Austin in August of 1975, the Thunderbirds became the house band, sharing the stage and jamming with such blues greats as Waters, Buddy Guy, B.B. King, Albert King and a host of others, all of whom recognized Vaughan as the man who would keep the music they developed alive for future generations. As Jimmie recalls, "One time when we were playing Antone's, opening for Muddy, I thought, okay, I'm going to do this Muddy Waters-style slide thing and see if I can get a reaction from him. And the next night I did it again. And he came out behind me and grabbed me around the neck, and said he liked it. And he told me, 'When I'm gone, I want you to do that, and show everybody that's what I did. I want you to do it for me.'" Vaughan recorded eight albums with The Fabulous Thuderbirds: Girls Go Wild on Tacoma/Chrysalis; What's The Word, Butt Rockin' and T-Bird Rhythm on Chrysalis; and Tuff Enuff (certified platinum), Hot Number, Powerful Stuff and Wrap It Up on Epic. On the strength of such hits as "Tuff Enuff," two Grammy Award nominations and years of worldwide touring, The Fabulous Thunderbirds brought the blues back into the pop charts and the contemporary musical lexicon, sparking a blues revival that continues unabated today. Prior to leaving the group in 1990, Jimmie had joined up with his brother Stevie to record Family Style, an album that reflected their mutually deep musical roots and maturing modern artistic sophistication. Then in August, 1990, just a few weeks prior to the album's release, Stevie Ray Vaughan died in a helicopter crash in Wisconsin. The tragedy devastated Jimmie, who retreated from touring and recording, though he continued to play guitar every day, as he has throughout his life. Meanwhile, the success of Family Style further enhanced Jimmie's reputation as a distinctive musical stylist. Eventually, Vaughan's friend Eric Clapton invited him to open a series of 16 special concerts at London's Royal Albert Hall. After the warm reception for his solo debut at the Clapton shows in early 1993, Jimmie started recording his first solo album. The resulting disc, Strange Pleasure, was produced by Nile Rodgers (who worked with the Vaughan brothers on Family Style), featured 11 songs written or co-written by Jimmie, and was dedicated to Stevie Ray and the recently deceased Albert Collins. It debuted at Number One on the Billboard Heatseeker Chart, was nominated for a Grammy for Best Blues Album and garnered reams of critical acclaim as Vaughan also stepped out on tour as a solo artist and bandleader. His next album, 1998's Out There, solidified Vaughan's status as a solo artist, thanks to a Grammy nomination for Best Rock Instrumental Performance (for the song "Ironic Twist"). As The Boston Phoenix noted in a four-star rave review, Out There featured "his best playing ever, bringing rich-toned exuberance to the familiar trappings of rippling blues and shuffle beats, soul grooves, and vocal arrangements that tap the celestial richness of the glory days of doo-wop." As Jimmie Vaughan emerged as an artist in his own right, his reputation as a master musician became even more apparent, thanks to the admiration of blues legends like B.B. King and Buddy Guy, such guitar superstars as Eric Clapton and Z.Z. Top's Billy Gibbons, and rising talents like Jonny Lang and Kenny Wayne Shepherd. As Clapton notes, "The first time I heard Jimmie Vaughan, I was impressed with the raw power of his sound. His style is unique, and if I've learned anything from him, it's to keep it simple." Likewise, Buddy Guy once proclaimed: "He's unbeatable when it comes to the blues. He just plays it like it's supposed to be played." Even Stevie Ray Vaughan acknowledged that when people would compare his playing to that of his brother, there was really no contest. "I play probably 80 percent of what I can play. Jimmie plays one percent of what he knows. He can play anything." Jimmie Vaughan is more modest in assessing his abilities, though very clear when it comes to his approach. "I try to speak with my guitar in sentences," he explains. "The people that I enjoy and the music that I enjoy are not about just a bunch of licks strung together. If you just play a bunch of guitar licks that aren't connected, it's like throwing a lot of words into a bowl. It doesn't make any sense. It's just words. "When I listen to Gene Ammons, the great saxophone player, I get the feeling he's telling you a story. That's how I'd like to play guitar someday, when I grow up. That's the goal. That's what I enjoy. That's what makes me get chill bumps–when you listen to music where the phrasing comes out and it speaks. That's the conclusion I've come to after 37 years of playing." Jimmie Vaughan's style as a player, songwriter and bandleader can be thought of as an amalgamation of so many influences. Known for his deceptively simple yet complex attack, his clean, uncluttered style capitalizes on conveying the emotion and message within the music, He utilizes raw emotion, simplicity, and an elegance that is powerful and accessible, yet communicates exactly what he feels inside. It's an approach that has earned him the respect of many of the greats of contemporary music, and guest appearances on such albums as B.B. King and Eric Clapton's Riding With The King, Bob Dylan's Under The Red Sky, Willie Nelson's Milk Cow Blues, Carlos Santana's Havana Moon and Don Henley's Inside Job. And in the same fashion that Vaughan revitalizes the classic blues and soul that informs his music, he has also become one of the foremost designers of classic custom cars. "I don't play golf. So cars are my hobby," he says with a chuckle. "I was into cars as soon as I was old enough to walk. I built lots of models when I was a teenager. It's not like transportation. It's art you can drive to the store." His first custom restored hot rod is a 1951 Chevy Fleetline that's become a well-known sight on the streets of Austin, TX over the years. He then augmented his collection with a 1963 Buick Riviera, and a 1961 Cadillac Coupe DeVille that took First Place at the 1999 Sacramento Autorama and Second Place at the 50th Annual Grand National Roadster show, and is currently on display at the Peterson Car Museum in Los Angeles. Vaughan is credited by his pal Eric Clapton with inspiring him to begin collecting and restoring classic roadsters as well. Yet for all his accomplishments and the admiration he has earned, Jimmie Vaughan remains modest when it comes to his life and work. "I'm just trying to have fun like everyone else," he concludes. "I've been playing since I was 13. I play every day. I've never stopped. I can't imagine that I could exist without it."

at Antone’s
213 West Fifth Street
Austin, United States

Truth About Fat Burning Foods: Review Examining Nick Pineaults Program Released


Houston, TX (PRWEB) June 06, 2013

The Truth About Fat Burning Foods, a 24 hour diet makeover product that use the French Paradox as its ethos for losing weight and claims to offer people the solution to ditching that unwanted lard for good has caught the attention of HealthAvenger.coms Stan Stevenson, prompting an investigative review.

The Truth About Fat Burning Foods is all about changing the food choices you make, and performing a literal kitchen makeover to ensure that the nutrition you eat to program your metabolism into burning fat in a way that you might not believe possible, reports Stevenson. Allowing yourself the odd cheat a couple of days of the week actually helps your body to burn more fat, not less. You wont feel deprived of your favorite foods.

The Truth About Fat Burning Foods is jam-packed full of information for any health conscious individual who wants to learn more about nutrition. People can expect to discover the 3 biggest mistakes, the crazy, dirty, and evil truth about salt, cooking oil sweeteners, and whole wheat, why some are worse than others, and the health food scandal. Recipes included enables users to create their mouth watering delights that they can binge on to their hearts content. They will learn about specific ingredients in sweeteners that might well contain zero calories, but actually make people gain weight and fat and how many health foods contain hidden heavy metals that actually make them store fat, rather than lose it.

Young or old, male or female, first ever diet or the latest in a long line of failures, then The Truth About Fat Burning Foods honestly is the definitive answer that you’ve been searching for. Youll, be amazed by the simplicity by which you can honestly change your fat loss fortune, says Stevenson. This is not a diet plan; it is a program designed to get you to change your way of eating for life. Just think, no more diets ever!

The Truth About Fat Burning Foods works, and works fast! One thing that pretty much all dieters do is to be far too restrictive on their intake. This series of manuals shows you not only the fattening and unhealthy foods to avoid, but also the ones youll be surprised that you should be eating. It takes less than 24 hours to makeover your kitchen and you learn rapidly about nutrition, which means the results start coming as soon as you implement the program. The information contained within the books is some of the most advanced and up to date that you can get your hands on.

Those wishing to purchase The Truth About Fat Burning Foods, or for more information, click here.

To access comprehensive The Truth About Fat Burning Foods review, visit http://healthavenger.com/truth-about-fat-burning-foods-review







African Mango Plus is Clinically Proven Effective Formula to Increase the Energy Level of the Body


(PRWEB) June 05, 2013

African mango plus is all the natural formula prepared from the African mango extracts, to boost the weight loss process. The product is in pill form and has helped millions of people with healthier and natural weight loss. Health experts have tested the product clinically and found highly effective to burn the excess fat, converting it into energy and increasing the energy level of the body. After such clinically proven results and approval of the health experts the product has gained the significant popularity and high demand from customers. FDA has also approved the product as safe for human health.

Visit Official Website of African Mango Plus for More Reviews.

Some natural products are enriched with the health beneficial properties. The people of Africa were using African mango so long for increasing the energy level of the body. Health experts, who have been working to find out the natural alternatives for weight loss, studied the African mango clinically. Studies revealed that the African mango actually promotes a faster fat burn, by speeding up the metabolism process. With the speedy metabolism, food is digested properly and fat is burned more quickly, converted into energy and hence increasing the energy level of the body. Health experts suggested that the African Mango can help a lot in the weight loss process. To aid the weight loss process, a natural supplement African Mango Plus was prepared from the extracts of African Mango.

The product is enriched with the natural properties of African Mango and clinically proven highly effective for weight loss and increasing the energy level of the body. The demographic with the age above 40 is mostly found conscious about their health and body weight. Health experts suggested the African mango plus for the women above 40 for speedy weight loss and improving energy level of the body. The product helps to melt excess fat from butts, thighs and waist, converts it into energy, and results an ultimate weight loss naturally without any negative side effects.

Visit http://www.africanmangoplus-reviews.com to read more information on African Mango Plus Reviews, Side Effects and Where to Buy.