Facebook, Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, AARP Magazine Lead Their Groups in Latest Media Rankings From BurrellesLuce

Livingston, NJ (PRWEB) November 17, 2009

Facebook has surged ahead of MySpace in the battle for market share among social networks, while The Wall Street Journal has pushed past USA Today as the daily newspaper with the biggest circulation, according to the latest edition of media rankings issued by BurrellesLuce.

The 45.5 percent market share garnered by Facebook, as of Oct. 31, 2009, was some 17.5 points higher than the share it held on May 2, 2009. During the same six-month span, MySpace saw its share fall by 11.3 points, to 20.3 percent. In the process, the two sites swapped first and second spot on the list of top 20 social networks. YouTube was the only other social network with double-digit market share: 13.6 percent, roughly 5 points more than at the start of May. Three additional sites attained market share of at least 1.0 percent: Tagged (1.7), Yahoo! Answers (1.1) and Twitter (1.0).

The above-cited rankings are contained in the 2010 edition of “Top Media Outlets: Newspapers, Blogs, Consumer Magazines & Social Networks,” which BurrellesLuce offers free to public relations and marketing professionals. The lists present the U.S.’s 20 busiest social networks, 25 most-popular English-language blogs, 25 largest consumer magazines, and 100 leading daily newspapers.

This is the seventh year that BurrellesLuce has produced rankings of top media, which are based on research it conducts twice a year. The latest social-network rankings reflect data reported by Hitwise as of Oct. 31, 2009; blog standings mirror Technorati’s Authority scores for Nov. 6, 2009; the newspaper figures are compiled by the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC) for the six-month period ending Sept. 30, 2009, and the magazine numbers are ABC’s for the six months ending June 30, 2009.

With a little over 2 million in circulation, The Wall Street Journal moved into the lead position among daily newspapers after occupying the second spot at the end of March 2009. USA Today, previously number one, slipped to second. Although there was some movement in the rankings of the leading 25 newspapers, the composition of that group on Sept. 30 was virtually identical to the makeup of the list on March 31.

Perched atop the blogs on Nov. 6 was The Huffington Post. That site also occupied first place on May 2, but precise comparisons between the two lists are not possible because, in the interim, Technorati’s Authority changed its methodology for measuring blog activity. (It now ranks authority on a scale of 0 to 1,000, with the latter representing the highest level of authority. Under the new formula, The Huffington Post scored 970, trailed by Gizmodo at 900 and TechCrunch at 899.)

As with the lists of the social networks and daily newspapers, the top two consumer magazines flipped position between the most-recent and immediately-prior reporting periods. In the latest standings, AARP The Magazine (24.6 million) was followed closely by AARP Bulletin (24.3 million). Twenty-three of the top 25 magazines in the first half of 2009 also had made the list in the six-month period ending December 2008. Of those 23 publications, the following 10 showed gains in total paid and verified circulation (named in descending order of circulation): AARP The Magazine, Woman’s Day, Family Circle, Ladies’ Home Journal, Game Informer, Time, Taste of Home, Sports Illustrated, Southern Living, and Maxim.

For a free copy of “Top Media Outlets: Newspapers, Blogs, Consumer Magazines, & Social Networks” log onto http://www.burrellesluce.com/top2010.

About BurrellesLuce

BurrellesLuce helps communication professionals maximize their media relations results by identifying relevant publicity channels, and capturing and measuring all relevant coverage in print, web, blog, broadcast, online, and social media outlets. Besides delivering content, the company’s online platform, BurrellesLuce 2.0

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