Fresh Prince: Google Translated | cdza Opus No. 16

CDZA co-founder Joe Sabia shows us what happens when we translate the lyrics of the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air through every language in Google Translate (64 times), and then taking what remains and translating it BACK into English. Featuring Jeremie Harris as Will Smith. Technically speaking, all but the first verse were translated. The lyrics were translated from English to the world’s most spoken language (Mandarin), to the second most (Spanish), to the third most, to the fourth most, ETC, putting all 64 languages in order by finding the demographic population size on every language on Wikipedia. Fun facts: The last translation we put it through was “Esperanto”, because apparently, only 10000 people speak it. No one has an official language of “Latin”, but we had to assume a lot of people are still able to speak it. So that was a bit ambiguous. Proper Nouns never really changed. Neither did numbers, as you can tell in the last stanza, “7,8”. We have no idea why we did this. Filmed on: December 10th, 2012 Location: Terminus Recording Studios, NYC (www.terminusnyc.com)
Video Rating: 4 / 5

17 Replies to “Fresh Prince: Google Translated | cdza Opus No. 16”

  1. Except Google Translator is the least accurate translator on the face of this planet and the historians who have translated the bible have years and years of experience and training. Nice try though.

  2. Jesus spoke Aramaic. He may have spoken in Greek especially to the Pharisees but he used his native tongue to teach the Jews. Aramaic is a very elaborate language which was difficult to translate directly into Greek. It is a spoken language. The writen form Hebrew, contains vocabularies which do not have direct translation in Greek. Therefore, so much of the real words of Jesus became lost in translation. I don’t believe in it either way. But if someone does they must realize it has many errors

  3. Actually if you are referring to the Christian or Hebrew bibles, that’s not true. Hebrew and Greek (also a little Aramaic in the New Testament) are the languages of the bible, and all of the copies of the bible in every language are a direct translation from those languages. The traditions were strong enough that copies were made incessantly, preserving the original wording and grammar to 99.5% accuracy. Not saying you have to believe the words that are in it, just saying that they are accurate

  4. Actually if you are referring to the Christian or Hebrew bibles, that’s not true. Hebrew and Greek (also a little Aramaic in the New Testament) are the languages of the bible, and all of the copies of the bible in every language are a direct translation from those languages. The traditions were strong enough that copies were made incessantly, preserving the original wording and grammar to 99.5% accuracy. Not saying you have to believe the words that are in it, just saying that they are accurate

  5. Actually if you are referring to the Christian or Hebrew bibles, that’s not true. Hebrew and Greek (also a little Aramaic in the New Testament) are the languages of the bible, and all of the copies of the bible in every language are a direct translation from those languages. The traditions were strong enough that copies were made incessantly, preserving the original wording and grammar to 99.5% accuracy. Not saying you have to believe the words that are in it, just saying that they are accurate.

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