Of Montreal, La Luz

Of Montreal, La Luz
Event on 2013-10-31 21:00:00

Music: Clubs:

When: 10/31/13 @ 9:00pm
Cost:
Call: 608-255-0901
Web: www.majesticmadison.com

More Information:
OF MONTREAL ANNOUNCES FALL TOUR

LOUSY WITH SYLVIANBRIAR OUT OCTOBER 8TH VIA POLYVINYL

Following the recent announcement of their new album lousy with sylvianbriar, of Montreal are back today to share news of their fall US tour. The tour kicks off with a hometown show in Athens, GA and sees the band hitting most major US markets before wrapping in Atlanta nearly a month later. Along the way of Montreal will be supported by the ladies of La Luz.

Defining of Montreal is impossible. There are too many perspectives to consider, angles to explore and layers to uncover. Just when you think you have a concept of what kind of creature they are they transform into something unexpected and new. As a result, each album holds the opportunity for re-discovery, re-immersion, re-appreciation.

On lousy with sylvianbriar, this paradigm holds true once more. The record was created with a new songwriting approach, a different recording method, and a fresh group of musicians. Seeking creative inspiration, Kevin Barnes re-located to San Francisco where he spent days soaking in the strange surroundings and channeling the city's energy into his writing. After a very prolific period there, he returned to Athens, GA and assembled the cast of musicians to begin the sessions.

Barnes eschewed computer recording, with its pitch correction, limitless effects plug ins and editing possibilities. Instead, with the help of engineer Drew Vandenberg (Deerhunter, Toro y Moi), he recorded lousy with sylvianbriar in his home studio on a 24 track tape machine. With no computer tricks to fall back on, the band – Kevin Barnes (guitars, bass, vocals), Rebecca Cash (vocals),Clayton Rychlik (drums, vocals), Jojo Glidewell (keys), Bob Parins (pedal steel, bass), and Bennet Lewis (guitars, mandolin) – could only get out of the recordings what they put into them. Most of the tracking was recorded live with the band in the same room together. They worked quickly, with the band members composing their parts on the fly with little second guessing. The album was recorded in just three weeks.

"I knew I wanted the process to be more in line with the way people used to make albums in the late 60s and early 70s," reveals Barnes. "I wanted to work fast and to maintain a high level of spontaneity and immediacy. I wanted the songs to be more lyric driven, and for the instrumental arrangements to be understated and uncluttered".

Opening track and lead single "fugitive air" feels like a Stones-y anthem, with sparks of Philip K Dick's psychedelic prose, Ralph Bakshi's cartoon violence and William S Burroughs' hyper-paranoia. "belle glade missionaries" finds Barnes lyrically at his most political, backed by a soundtrack that is pure Dylan circa Highway 61 Revisited.

Female vocalist Rebecca Cash makes several appearances on the album, taking the lead on the plaintive "raindrop in my skull," where her and Barnes share a Gram Parsons/Emmylou Harris-inspired duet.

"she ain't speakin' now" ranks among of Montreal's all-time great songs, transforming its brooding acoustic guitar intro into a visceral angst-ridden rocker that sounds like the best moments of Neil Young & Crazy Horse. The album's closer "imbecile rages", a caustic and doleful epitaph for a crumbling relationship, is one of Barnes' most raw and personal statements.

Like the classic albums that inspired it, this is an album to be explored, to be lived with, to be listened to in happiness and in darkness, to be dissolved into. To be played very loudly at parties and with eyes closed, in headphones, alone. It should become dog-eared and dirty with use and it should lessen the blow of our enemies, in all of their forms.

The album will be available digitally, on tape, CD and 180-gram vinyl. 1,500 copies of vinyl will be clear green vinyl and available through Polyvinyl's E-store exclusively, while the other retail copies will be pink vinyl. Cassette edition limited to 250 hand-numbered copies on green cassettes, courtesy of Joyful Noise Recordings.

PRE-ORDER: http://www.polyvinylrecords.com/lousywithsylvianbriar

$ $

LA LUZ TO RELEASE DEBUT LP IT'S ALIVE 10/15, TOURING WITH OF MONTREAL THIS FALL

In less than a year, surf-noir four-piece La Luz have gone from being virtual unknowns to one of the most talked-about bands in their native Seattle, with a sold-out cassette EP on Burger Records (Damp Face) and seven-inches for Water Wing and Suicide Squeeze under their belts. Now, the band has readied their anticipated debut full-length, out October 15th from Hardly Art. It's Alive was recorded in the same North Seattle trailer park studio as Damp Face and crystallizes their lauded, expertly-wrought sound. Pitchfork premiered the first mp3 single from It's Alive, "Big Big Blood". In October, the band will open for Of Montreal on a nationwide tour.

About the record:

Seattle's La Luz recorded their debut EP, Damp Face, in a small trailer on a hot August day. But barring the inevitable "no-AC-in-the-van" summer tour calamity, La Luz runs cool. Their brand of coolness isn't about distance or affect; it's a mood, and–sue me, but I'm about to totally rip off Zelda Fitzgerald: Something about this music vibrates to the dusky, dreamy smell of dying moons and shadows. So yeah, that kind of cool.

Still, La Luz's live shows, more than most these days, are about connection. It's evident that the four ridiculously talented ladies on stage are not only playing music with each other, but for each other. And they engage their audience as well. Like a proper punk band—which they are not— they give you shit for not dancing. They convey a gritty self-possession, a sense that they've been there and back again. And, like the expert, but seemingly effortless, surf licks and meandering bass lines that rise and fall throughout their songs, their mocking is playful and dreamy and disarming enough to get most of the crowd (and sometimes the keyboard player) dancing down the center line of a soul train.

But as any half-assed Freudian will tell you, there can be no meaningful connection without first weathering some dark and lonely times. Here comes the chilly part: What makes La Luz stand out—and stand out fast—the band has only been playing together for a year and people took notice almost immediately—is that this is a band that embodies that most elusive slant on the human condition: longing, and the fleeting relief that tags alongside deep desire.

In Spanish, La Luz means "light" and that's the perfect thing to evoke when your songs give the illusion of veering in the opposite direction. But lift out most any lyric—which is a good excuse to give a closer listen to the delicate, four-part harmonies that are fast becoming the band's signature—and you'll find that the aches and pains of love and loss, of living in a world where no foothold is ever a promise—all this is delivered with a nuanced dose of perfectly timed exhilaration, like the whole thing might just be worth it in the end.

Last spring, La Luz returned to that steamy trailer park to record It's Alive – the much-anticipated follow up to Damp Face – with their friend and engineer Johnny Goss. From the first get-psyched drum roll and eerie chords of "Sure As Spring", the dinged-up pop gem that opens the album, the rest moves like a slow drive on a dangerous road, slinking and bending as the terrain shifts. On "What Good Am I?", the lead vocals, and the swirl of harmonies that surround it, recall the Spartan haze of Mazzy Star's misty-eyed super hit. Smack in the middle is the title track. "It's Alive" is a jangly rocker with a spooky refrain, oodles of ooohs, and a marauding narrative that nails down the misty logic of the rest of the album. Two instrumentals, "Sunstroke" and "Phantom Feelings", showcase the band's beach jam surf chops, and fall perfectly between the chilled out heartache that surrounds them.

In October, Seattle's Hardly Art will release the sum of these tracks: It's Alive.

Defining of Montreal is impossible. There are too many perspectives to consider, angles to explore, layers to uncover. Just when you think you have a concept of what kind of creature they are, they transform into something unexpected and new.

As a result, each album holds the opportunity for re-discovery, re-immersion, re-appreciation.

On Lousy with Sylvianbriar, this paradigm holds true once more. The record was created with a new songwriting approach, a different recording method, and a fresh group of musicians.

Seeking creative inspiration, Kevin Barnes re-located to San Francisco where he spent days soaking in the strange surroundings and channeling the city’s energy into his writing. After a very prolific period there, he returned to Athens, GA, and assembled the cast of musicians to begin the sessions.

Barnes eschewed computer recording—with its pitch correction, limitless effects plug-ins and editing possibilities—and instead, with the help of engineer Drew Vandenberg (Deerhunter, Toro y Moi), he recorded Lousy with Sylvianbriar in his home studio on a 24-track tape machine.

With no computer tricks to fall back on, the band—Kevin Barnes (guitars,bass,vocals), Rebecca Cash (vocals), Clayton Rychlik (drums,vocals), Jojo Glidewell (keys), Bob Parins (pedal steel,bass), and Bennet Lewis (guitars,mandolin)—could only get out of the recordings what they put into them. Most of the tracking was recorded live with the band in the same room together. They worked quickly, with the band members composing their parts on the fly and with little second guessing. The album was recorded in just three weeks.

“I knew I wanted the process to be more in line with the way people used to make albums in the late 60s and early 70s,” reveals Barnes. “I wanted to work fast and to maintain a high level of spontaneity and immediacy. I wanted the songs to be more lyric-driven, and for the instrumental arrangements to be understated and uncluttered.”

Opening track and lead single “Fugitive Air” feels like a Stones-y anthem, with sparks of Philip K. Dick’s psychedelic prose, Ralph Bakshi’s cartoon violence, and William S. Burroughs’ hyper-paranoia.

“Belle Glade Missionaries” finds Barnes lyrically at his most political, backed by a soundtrack that is pure Dylan circa Highway 61 Revisited.
Female vocalist Rebecca Cash makes several appearances on the album, taking the lead on the plaintive “Raindrop in My Skull,” where her and Barnes share a Gram Parsons/Emmylou Harris-inspired duet.

“She Ain’t Speakin’ Now” ranks among of Montreal’s all-time great songs, transforming its brooding acoustic guitar intro into a visceral angst-ridden rocker that sounds like the best moments of Neil Young & Crazy Horse.

The album’s closer, “Imbecile Rages,” a caustic and doleful epitaph for a crumbling relationship, is one of Barnes’ most raw and personal statements.
Like the classic albums that inspired it, this is an album to be explored, to be lived with, to be listened to in happiness and in darkness, to be dissolved into. To be played very loudly at parties and with eyes closed, in headphones, alone. It should become dog-eared and dirty with use and it should lessen the blow of our enemies, in all their forms.

Tweet!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');

at Majestic Theater
115 King Street
Madison, United States

Leave a Reply