Stem Cell Research Results in Information Overload and Demand for a Solution

Gloucester, MA (PRWEB) April 24, 2013

Representatives of Computer Review today said that stem cell research around the globe gained such impetus since the 1990s that the knowledge had created an information deluge, overwhelming users. Computer Review’s tools applied to today’s research problems like the Knowledge Economy Selection Chart and their new smartphone app, CREATE, make indexing and accessing stem cell information databases so much easier.

“This is news because stem cell research is ballooning,” a representative said. “Our directories monitor thousands of private and public companies invested in stem cell research, and we’re witnessing a vast amount of current stem cell research documents.” The representative went on to say that Computer Review’s objective was to save subscribers time and money.

As biotech companies spend millions of dollars researching promising areas like vertebrate embryos, reaching out to collaborate with universities and other, bigger biotech companies usually follows; but what universities or companies pursue the same goals? A database that answers a biotech’s business intelligence questions could save enormous time and money, especially when it’s updated daily, the representative said. With Computer Review, subscribers get complete access to CREATE, the tablet and smartphone tool that reaches the stem cell research database from anywhere.

Big pharmaceutical companies may do most of their research in-house, but it’s not uncommon to look to biotech companies for promising product development, an idea that may seem daunting on the surface. A pharmaceutical research and development department looking to collaborate with publicly and privately funded biotech projects might find it advantageous to study company documents. Computer Review and CREATE can give subscribers access. When academic or industrial players spearhead a biotech project, the original documents from company and university sources are an incredible resource; one it may not be able to be without.

“So much of the knowledge economy is accessible to subscribers,” the representative said. Information about pro-life politicians efforts to limit stem cell research to adults is a serious, grass-roots trend, but at the local level, people miss it. Since bloggers cover it, Computer Review’s subscribers can be aware. The commitment a research lab has to serious medical and therapeutic applications of stem cell research may well be news to competitive executives, if they only knew. A lonely technician who wants a job developing products that will affect people to day may want to figure out what labs share the same ideal.

Investors may want to discover companies developing stem cell treatments from autologous, adipose-derived regenerative cells. They may believe that the application of bio-engineered tissue product and regenerative medicine and stem cells to repair failing organs sounds like an interesting investment. What investors, job seekers, executives and companies need is knowledge. Computer Review can cut out 95 percent of the noise and give them what they want.

Computer Review is a one-stop, comprehensive source for the knowledge economy. With search bots, Computer Review monitors 538 stem cell research companies in 36 countries across the globe for subscribers interested in sales, marketing, human resources, research development and more. Subscribers include analysts, tech investors, advertisers, business planners, consultants, educators, marketing executives and technicians. Every subscription to Computer Review includes CREATE, the tablet and smartphone tool, so now, regardless of where subscribers are located, Computer Review cuts out 95 percent of the clutter and gets them the information they want.

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