The Chemistry Between CSR and PR

London, England (PRWEB UK) 28 November 2014

London School of Marketing (LSM), a leading institution offering accredited marketing and business qualifications in the heart of London, has released its latest whitepaper titled, The Chemistry Between CSR and PR.

As a resource for professionals and students alike, The Chemistry Between CSR and PR, written in partnership with BQu Research, joins a host of other valuable resources freely available on the LSM website to existing and prospective students.

Theoretically speaking, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Public Relations (PR) are two distinct business practices, which have no real scientific connection to one another. In the academic sphere, these two business practices could be considered two stand-alone efforts that are never linked, states the whitepaper. However, in real life the relationship between CSR and PR is a completely different story. Our latest whitepaper reveals a surprising chemistry between these two practices.

The in-depth document, downloadable for free, looks at the definition of both CSR and PR, their relevance in the business world, and how the combination of the two can deliver highly effective results.

Over time, the synergy between CSR and PR has come under a sharper focus, as business strategists have slowly begun drawing both practices closer, the whitepaper continues. CSR and PR have today come a very long way, but debates around the highly questionable relationship between the two are still being fuelled.

To download a copy, click here.

London School of Marketing delivers accredited marketing and business qualifications, and offers courses from recognised professional bodies such as CIM, EduQual and CAM, BA (Hons) Marketing, MA Marketing and Innovation, and an MBA from Anglia Ruskin University. Based in Central London, they are a QAA approved institution. The school also has offices in Sri Lanka, a network of Local Access Points (LAPs), and online programmes of learning. Courses are run over a broad range of study modes

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