Washington State University to Present on Tin Nanoneedles: A Technology for Lithium-ion Batteries, at Knowledge Foundations Next Generation Batteries 2013 Conference

Boston, MA (PRWEB) March 13, 2013

Industry leaders from around the world will convene in Boston, MA for the Knowledge Foundations 2nd Next Generation Batteries 2013 conference which will take place at the Hilton Boston Back Bay on April 30 May 1. One of the many anticipated presentations will include M. Grant Norton, PhD, of Washington State University as he presents Tin Nanoneedles: A Cost Effective, Industry-Scalable Anode Technology for Lithium-ion Batteries

Presentation Abstract:

Tin Nanoneedles: A Cost Effective, Industry-Scalable Anode Technology for Lithium-ion Batteries

M. Grant Norton, PhD, Washington State University

Tin is an attractive anode technology for next generation lithium-ion batteries because of its higher theoretical capacity than graphite. However, there is a large volume change during lithiation/delithiation cycling, which can degrade cell performance. To accommodate the volume change we synthesize the tin in the form of 1-D nanostructures using electroplating. Cell performance shows that these nanostructured tin anodes deliver capacities close to the theoretical value and have cycling stability exceeding most non-carbon-based anodes. Electroplating is a cost effective and industry scalable process to directly form tin nanostructures for lithium-ion battery anodes. Because of the mild synthesis conditions a wide range of substrates, including flexible and wearable materials, can be coated. This presentation will be given by M. Grant Norton, PhD of Washington State University at Next Generation Batteries 2013

Next Generation Batteries 2013 program topics will include:

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